Lottery Guy

Buying Lottery Scratch Off Tickets In Bulk [video]

August 1st, 2017   ·   Read 39 Comments...

You have to be fairly brave to risk buying whole rolls of scratch off lottery tickets in one go. Or do you..?

Well, here’s one guy who did exactly that. And not just once either (spending a total of $2,700). I won’t spoil the surprise of how much he ends up winning – you’ll have to watch yourself to find out 🙂

Do you know how to ‘get the edge’ with scratchers? Check out Dave’s service here. Not only will it help you find the best scratchers to play in your State (sorry, US only) – it only costs $20 for an entire year!

Don’t forget that out of any roll of tickets you’re certain to win back at least some of your initial outlay.

If you check the back of the tickets the ‘win something’ rate is typically about 1 ticket out of 4, on average. Which means if there are 50 tickets in a roll then about 12 of them will be winners. You just don’t know how many of those winners are going to be worth anything decent. That’s the tricky bit 🙂

What’s the most scratchers you’ve ever bought in one go? Have you ever bought a whole roll? How did you do? Add a comment below.

P.S. If scratchers are your thing you might also like ‘How To Win Scratch Offs’. It’s the scratchers guide book written by an ex-lottery ‘insider’. It’s pricey, but not bad.

Bulk scratching

Categories: Chances Of Winning

39 Comments so far ↓

  • BobP

    The total number of scratch off sellers in your state versus the total number of prizes worth winning still available is an important part of your actual odds of winning.

    • LG

      Not sure I follow you Bob – the amount of tickets left on sale does matter, but I don’t see how the total number of sellers makes any difference?

      • BobP

        Say there are 3000 retailers and 100 prizes left worth winning, what are the odds your retailer has one of them? With lotto you make your own luck, you don’t have to worry whether your seller even has a worthwhile prize in the case.

      • LG

        I kind of see what you mean. But there are a specific number of tickets printed for each game – and that’s what determines your overall chances, not how many stores sell tickets. You can enhance your chances of winning by figuring out which games have the most prizes left (big and small) and the least tickets remaining. But it’s a hassle, which is why Dave’s service is such good value.

  • BobP

    Exactly, there are the overall odds and then there are your personal odds on whether the store you are standing in has any ticket worth over $100 in the case or machine. If there are thousands of stores and hundreds of good first and second tier prizes not all stores can have good prizes. And as Dave’s service can help, the number of prizes still available factor in, only three top tier prizes left, what are the odds your store has one of them.

    • LG

      Not really. Your personal odds always depend on how many tickets are left overall and how many prizes remain. There’s no data available at a store level. So you can’t derive anything usable from the number of stores.

      Even if every store sold an equal number of tickets (they differ enormously anyway), knowing that there are a thousand stores just tells you that there are lots of places to buy tickets :-).

      There’s probably just as many rolls of tickets in secure storage ready to resupply the stores.

  • Frederick

    I’d like to try Dave’s service but I can’t afford the 20 dollar price and even if I could, I can’t afford to buy scratchers or any other lottery tickets. Oh well.

  • Steve

    I have a question about the scratchers. I am sure the lottery knows where every winners, every roll is scanned in at the stores, every winner is scanned, you can’t enter winners into a second chance drawing if they are winners, so, yes they do know. My question then is, do they take the available prizes left off at the time of sale or at the time it is claimed. If it is when they are claimed, then there could be a lot of winners that are held onto, some don’t expire for 6 months and some don’t expire for a year, plus you have to account for the tickets that they take back that aren’t sold by the end of sale date?

    • LG

      Hi Steve

      Sorry, I don’t really understand your question. Does who take the available prizes left off – do you mean the retailer or the lottery company? And do they take it off of what? The amount the retailer pays the lottery company? Or something else?

      • Steve

        My question was, how does the lottery officials actually know how many prizes are left for a particular scratch game? Can they tell when the ticket is sold because it is scanned at the time of sale and they know a winner was sold, the same way they know when you enter a winning ticket for a second chance drawing? Usually winning second chance tickets can’t be entered and it will show invalid entry. Do they wait until the winner claims the prize? How do they get an accurate count of how many prizes are left?

      • LG

        Ah OK, I understand now.

        From the top. No, I don’t believe any lottery company knows where the winning tickets are, or what rolls they are in. There’s no need. They are simply randomly allocated throughout the whole print run. All the lottery company need to know is that there are the right number of prizes, and the right number of tickets.

        They also don’t know when a winning ticket is sold, as nothing is scanned at that point. But they don’t really need to that know either :-).

        They do know when a prize is claimed, because the retailer scans the ticket (or for larger wins they handle the claims anyway). So a prize is therefore ‘remaining’ until it’s claimed.

        Theoretically that means a ‘remaining prize’ (or unclaimed prize as some companies term it) may never be claimed as the ticket could have been lost.

        The funds to pay out any remaining prizes is held for some time, typically for 6-12 months, after the game is closed/withdraw from sale. Any tickets unclaimed after that are no longer valid and the funds are released back into the lottery coffers.

  • Eddy

    My son once bought a whole roll of $20 tickets (30 tics on the roll) for a $600 outlay. After scratching them, he had only “won back” about $350 or so! Fortunately, the tickets he bought were also included in a second chance drawing. About a week later, he started registering the losing tickets into his second chance account. One of his losing tickets kept reading “invalid entry”. He then reevaluated the ticket to find he had a matching number, and it was a $1000 winner. He got lucky there for sure, and, as far as I know, hasn’t done it again.

  • Stephanie G

    Buying a roll is like purchasing single tickets – the odds are the same. I bought plenty of rolls, and here is another fun fact – if your first winning ticket of that roll is cash or a symbol, that’s what the rest of any winning ticket in that pack will be. You will not find cash and symbol tickets in that roll.

    • LG

      That’s right – the odds of each individual ticket are exactly the same no matter how many you buy. Each ticket is a unique game/play that can’t affect the outcome of any other. But obviously buying more increases the chances that at least one of them will be a winner (buy 2 double your chances etc).

      I wasn’t really sure what you meant about a winning ticket being cash or a symbol, but tickets are randomly placed.

  • Joe Horner

    I wanna know how many tickets are in a whole pack of 30$ MD lottery scratch offs?

    • LG

      Typically around 30 tickets for the higher priced games, sometimes up to 50. It varies by state and game.

      But for a specific game just ask the retailer – they’ll be happy to tell you.

  • Vic

    In my place scratchers are not sold in “bunches”, so I usually buy 10-20 consecutive tickets. Interestingly, my general balance is always a positive one. Which – pity – cannot be said about my normal lottery games, where I am a net loser 🙁

  • Geoff Sallis

    In Australia they do not publish if prizes have already been won on strachies. Why would they? People would stop buying them. Also about 20 or more years ago I bought 10 x $2 stratchies and did not win 1 prize. So the theory about buying a whole book is garbage. I stopped buying them for 20 years after that only resuming buying them in recent years because my earnings are higher and I cannot afford to buy a few every week. It’s better to buy just 1 at a time I’ve found and from different agencies.

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